Do people remember you?

One of the most important assets you have when you market yourself and your services is your reputation and your personal brand.

What do you do to stand out? Are you consistent? That’s an important hallmark in building your personal brand.

Let’s talk about the benefits of having a strong personal brand. When people know you for a specific result, outcome, way of being or their relationship with you, you are more memorable.

Being more memorable gives you an advantage over the many others who are in your same category.

Each person has something unique about who they are or their capabilities. Do you know what is unique about you?

The power in your personal brand is to understand what is different and unique about you that matters to your clients. If you are an expert on food or ancient Greece or social media, it only matters if your desired customers want that or if they have the same interests and passions.

This week, observe people you interact with on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. As you observe them, ask yourself these questions:

– What makes them memorable?
– Is it what they do?
– Is it how they do what they do?
– Is it their personality?
– Is it their client list?

If you find yourself realizing that some people are easily recalled in your memory, ask yourself why that is. What is it about this person that doesn’t stand out.

Be open-minded to what they do to be more memorable or what they don’t do. Find some benchmarks and role models and determine what you can do to be more memorable.

The people who are memorable to me for my business are ones who understand my business opportunities and offer ideas and solutions. They go out of their way to connect me to people and resources that could help.

I’d love for you to join my Market You Mondays community on Facebook and add your comments and ask questions.

Kathy Garland specializes in translating business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. Join her conversations on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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What do you do?

Last week’s Market YOU Monday tip was about How to Say What You Do in Ten Words or Less (scroll down to my blog post for January 10, 2011 to read last week’s tip.)

I promised I would share what to say when someone asks you what you do – which is different than last week but involves what you decided you would say about yourself.

When someone asks what you do, with a smile, share your positioning statement or your ten-word or less statement you wrote last week. You should talk about the change that people have as a result of working with you. You want this to be interesting enough that they ask you to tell them more.

This is an opportunity for you to learn more about them so when they ask more, I suggest you add a sentence or two more and then ask them questions. It’s always a good sign when someone is asking you questions about what you do.

To keep your dialogue from becoming a monologue, turn the tables and work in some questions for the other person. Start with questions such as:

1. What type of people (or businesses) are your ideal client?

2. What is the most important thing you are working on now in your business?

When you ask these questions, you find out a little more about the other person that you can use to further discussion. Your goal is to find out several things:

– are they a good fit for your network?

– are they interested in what you do?

– do they have the qualities, needs and attributes of your ideal client?

– have you said yes to at least two of the above?

If so then set up a time to meet them for coffee or lunch, or set a follow up call. You will want to find out what you can do to stay connected with them so you can continue to build a relationship of trust.

Next week watch for tips on building relationships.

Kathy Garland specializes in translating business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. Join her conversations on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Join the Market You Mondays community on Facebook to learn more about marketing yourself as an expert.

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Stepping up in 2011

What one thing, that if you do it or accomplish it, would make 2011 a breakaway year for you? That’s the question on my mind as we end 2010.

Having a focus and a driving vision of what you want is much more powerful than having the attitude that everything will be the same.

To be a more effective leader, step up with a vision for 2011, a BHAG, or Big Hairy Audacious Goal. Don’t be afraid you won’t accomplish a big goal. Go for it and you will learn and experience new things along the way.

How do you think about what you want to accomplish that would make your year a breakaway year? Here are my thoughts on that:

1. Write down dreams and goals you have that you haven’t accomplished yet.

2.  Where do you see yourself in a few years? What do you need to do to move yourself in that direction?

3. What is it that you are passionate about? That makes it much easier to accomplish than forcing yourself to do something you think you should do.

3. When you know what you want to accomplish, share your big goal with your trusted confidants. This declaration fuels your energy and drive to make it happen.

A few years ago, a friend and client, Brittany Allen, really wanted to serve children in need, particularly sick children. Her dream was to be a caring clown. She was at my annual planning retreat and really got clear that her year was about stepping up to create her clown personae and get out in the public performing. Here is a photo of her making that declaration during our weekend:

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Brittany had created her clown shoes as a way to get started. Now she has regular performances to entertain children in need and she is going on an international trip to entertain orphans. She is extremely happy and fulfilled. It all started with deciding what she wanted and then stepping up to take the actions. She was supported by the other people at the retreat who also believed in her vision.

Have a fantastic 2011 and step up by getting focused on the one thing that when you accomplish it, would create a very memorable and breakaway year.

Happy New Year!

 

Kathy Garland specializes in turning business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She hosts a radio show, “The Leader in You” and speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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Merry Everything!

One of my friends greeted me with Merry Everything! at a holiday party. It’s a fun greeting when you don’t know what tradition people celebrate and covers all sorts of occasions.

I trust that whatever you celebrate this time of year that you are enjoying life. It’s a good time to bring back or start family traditions and rituals which help connect us and bring meaning. Today and tomorrow our kids are coming in from California and we are so excited to see them. We always go out to dinner together so we can catch up without the distraction of the kitchen, and we also love to prepare at least one meal together. Both of these always bring us closer.

Another part of the holidays that is important to me is the music. This morning at the gym, I tuned into Pandora and have found several holiday stations that set a peaceful holiday environment. Josh Groban’s holiday station plays some of my favorites like The Prayer, Ava Maria and O Holy Night, all of which reduce me to a puddle of tears of joy for their beauty and meaning.

Make sure you take time for what brings you joy and the it will make the holiday stress that could be pass much easier.

When the celebrations are over and you have some quiet time to reflect, look back and appreciate yourself for what you did this year, who you helped, what you figured out, what you moved forward and for all the joyous times in your life.

Merry Everything! Merry Christmas! Joyeux Noel! Feliz Navidad!

Kathy Garland specializes in turning business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She hosts a radio show, “The Leader in You” and speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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A personal story

On October 4, 2010, Private Cody Board from McKinney, Texas was killed in action in Afghanistan. I do not know Cody or his family. His story caught my attention at a high school football game. His father and brother were there in his honor, only a few days after he died because his high school alma mater dedicated the game to him.

The story doesn’t stop there though. The media reported that a radical group from Kansas, who hates soldiers, was planning to protest at his funeral. They have a record of protesting at soldiers’ funerals and travel wherever they can to disrupt memorial services. On Facebook, a counter-protest was organized to show support for the family and the deceased soldier.

My heart told me I needed to be there, not from a counter-protest reason, but because if it were my son or daughter that had died, I would want privacy to grieve and say good-bye without experiencing anger and protest. Because it spread so quickly through Facebook, on Saturday morning, a large crowd turned out for support and protection for the family. McKinney residents, off-duty police, citizen patrols, Patriot Guards (Harley riders who attend veteran’s funerals for support and protection) and even a small group of men dressed in red, white and blue Colonial military uniforms surrounded the church.

Because of the pro-active thinking of one man who put up a page on Facebook, we surrounded the church with people, signs of support, flags and love for the family. I held up ok until the funeral procession left the church. As we watched the cars head out of the church, surrounded by police on motorcycles and the Patriot Guards, I realized the finality of Private Board’s life and the heartbreak of his family. I was comforted to see that people in the funeral procession were grateful we were there and appreciated our support.

I was only one in a crowd that day, however, together we all made a difference. The crowd is a powerful force. Our intention and show of support created a special experience for us as well as the family.

Never underestimate your power as an individual.

By the way, no signs of protestors were seen. I like to think that when they saw that they couldn’t get close to the church because of all of us and the police, that they just went away.

Photos below: People lining the streets, Patriot Riders supporting the family, a group of men dressed up as Colonial soldiers guard the front of the church, and the McKinney mounted police with many other police showed up to protect the family.

 

McKinney Supporters         Patriot riders show up for the family      

Colonial soldiers on honor guard           McKinney Mounted Police

 

Kathy Garland specializes in turning business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She hosts a radio show, “The Leader in You” and speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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Reaching out to customers

Last weekend, my friend, Donna, and I went to the Cottonwood Art Festival in Richardson. The weather was superb, sunny and delightful. This is a juried show, so the art is phenomenal, inspirational and fun.

As we wandered through the show, going in and out of the booths, we enjoyed talking to the artists and hearing about their work. We quickly decided on our favorites and dreamed of where we would put their art in our homes. Since we are neighbors, we shared ideas and offered suggestions.

One particular artist appealed to us both. It is a man who creates flowers and garden type art in mixed media. As we were looking at his art, we asked the woman working the booth a few questions. We were shocked at her lack of interest, even though we expressed admiration and delight at the artist’s work.

When asked if art could be shipped if we decided later, her comment was “It’s really expensive to ship from Florida” and “No we don’t sell online.” We found a series of 12” x 12” paintings that would look great over a fireplace. When we asked, she said, “We don’t ship those.”

Hmmm, we said to each other. She doesn’t seem interested at all in making the sale. Her comments and her tone of voice indicated we were clearly irritating her.

We loved the art and had she been more curious and open to our questions and understood even the most basic of sales conversations, we may have bought on the spot, instead of saying we needed to think about it and order later. I’m not inclined to buy anything at all, however, perhaps this artist just made a bad judgment in who represented him at this show.

Everyone today takes longer to make decisions. People want to carefully consider where to spend their money. You will do your customers a favor to have a conversation with them about your products and services and help them discover their own excitement about the value of what you offer. Help them see using your product or service and how it will benefit them. It may take longer to make a sale, however, you’ll both benefit in the end.

Kathy Garland specializes in turning business challenges into opportunities that result in business and personal growth. She hosts a radio show, “The Leader in You” and speaks frequently on business growth and leadership topics. For more information, visit Kathy Garland International. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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